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New community driven online project, Libre Music Production (LMP), launches today

Make music the free, open and easy way with Libre Music Production!

New community driven online project, Libre Music Production (www.libremusicproduction.com), launches today, Sunday 17th August 2014.

This new resource focuses on promoting music creation and composition using Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS).

The idea of Libre Music Production (LMP) was born out of a perceived lack of integrated resources, and in particular a lack of information aimed at new and non-technical users.

By providing hands-on material submitted by the community, such as guides, tutorials, articles and news updates, Libre Music Production shows you that there is great FLOSS audio software out there, and also how to practically use that software to make music.

To read the full press release, visit www.libremusicproduction.com/pressrelease

Ardour and Money, 2014 edition

This is being written on June 20th, 2014, basically 2/3rds of the way through the month, and roughly half way through the year. Over there on the right hand side it says that the project has received a total of just under $1800 this month.

I really don't like writing articles about Ardour and money. I like to think that successful and worthy projects will magically fund themselves, and obviously, I like to think that Ardour is successful and worthy. This is wrong thinking, however.

Music, 2013

This isn't a music site, but Ardour exists mostly for the purpose of about making music and as we draw close to the end of 2013, I wanted to provide my own counter to a few other websites' "Best of 2013" music lists. I listen to music almost non-stop while developing Ardour - often Soma.FM's "Sonic Universe" stream - and it plays a very important role in the process, and my life in general.

Why Open Source? Why Free (as in speech) Software?

Some people who come across Ardour and start reading about its "odd" license (the GPL, used by thousands or tens of thousands of software applications and libraries around the world) end up asking "what is with this whole open source/free software thing anyway?" or "why don't the Ardour developers just release Ardour like a normal commercial, proprietary program?".

It isn't a complete answer to this kind of question, but as exhibit 13.1(a) part 8, I offer you:

http://www.zdnet.com/users-petition-avid-to-sell-sibelius-music-software...

Fixing LADSPA Plugins for Ardour 2.8.13 on OS X Intel

The packaging of "builtin" LADSPA plugins in Ardour 2.8.13 was broken, making all 95 plugins included there unusable. A new package was released to correct the problem, but if you already downloaded 2.8.13 you might want to fix the problem in a faster, more direct way.

Ardour and MP3

I had written an article here about using MP3 files with Ardour. Our Linux users often ask why they can't import MP3 files. The article explained the licensing issues that make that tricky, and then went on to explain why using MP3 (or other lossy compression format) files as source material in a project is a bad idea. I am still very strongly convinced that it continues to be a bad idea, but it seems counter-productive to have that debate in this context. I have left everyone's comments in place for those who want to read them.

Ardour in 2012: what to look forward to

As 2011 draws to a close, I wanted to point people toward the future with a brief summary of what to expect from Ardour in 2012.

Building Ardour 2.X from source

Required tools

You will need to ensure that your system has the following sofware building tools installed:

Required libraries

Recovering from the mute bug ...

Although Ardour 2.8.9 no longer suffers from the subtle bug that caused the mute button(s) to no longer work by default, many users of Ardour will not see the situation change until they remove their ~/.ardour2/ardour.rc file. This probably contains default settings for mute like this:

    <Option name="mute-affects-pre-fader" value="yes"/>
    <Option name="mute-affects-post-fader" value="yes"/>
    <Option name="mute-affects-control-outs" value="yes"/>
    <Option name="mute-affects-main-outs" value="yes"/>

If your version of this file has value="no" for those options, you should either edit it by hand (its just a text file) so that it says value="yes" instead or just remove the file entirely. Editing is preferable, but removing the file will not hurt. Note that the following values y,Y,1,yes,Yes,YES are all equivalent to "yes" and similarly n,N,0,no,No,NO are all equivalent to "no".

You should also check the file /etc/ardour2/ardour_system.rc, or a related location if you installed Ardour somewhere non-standard) for the same issue, though it is less likely to be seen there. Do NOT remove this file - if it contains "no" as the settings for these options, you should edit the file.

Reflections on "Intuitive"

People sometimes criticize a piece of software as being "unintuitive". In fact, its one of the most common complaints you'll hear whenever anyone starts using a new piece of software. Its often entirely justified too - its rare that a complex application manages to be obvious to every new user, or even most new users. Some software developers have a good track record here, Apple in particular, whose rules and guidelines for how to design user interfaces keeps on manage to churn out remarkably intuitive software. Well, it does as long the application is fairly simple and its scope is well defined. By the time you get to applications such as Final Cut Pro or Logic Pro, it would be hard to find anyone who found them "intuitive" in the same way that, say, iTunes or even Garageband is. Read more below ...