Hour long radio program

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tallpaul
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This is an hour long radio program edited with Ardour (+ Rezound).

http://kboo.fm/node/17961

I thought people might be interested in uses other than music based ones.

Rezound was used to scan the original raw material (about 5 hours worth) and cut it into chunks which were then assembled in Ardour. This is the first time I have ever used Ardour and the smoothness of the work flow was very impressive.

Radio editing is a different beast to making music but for assembling things ardour worked very well. I think it was quicker doing the rough edits in rezound first, though I could have done this in Ardour. The one big difference I noticed was in the length of time it took to export stuff. Time is often very critical in radio work since there tends to be absolute deadlines (i.e. time of broadcast). and I wasn't used to or expecting it to take place pretty much in real time. It was ok for the final export, even if it meant I didn't get to bed till 3am the night before broadcast, since I appreciated the quality of final product, but it could add up when I have to cut down several hours of audio first.

Is there anyway to speed this up? For instance by controlling sample rates?

chrisg
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Joined: 2006-03-27
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Ardour/Jack has a freewheel mode which it uses during exporting. This allows it to go as fast as your system will allow, so it's odd that you say it went at near real time.

What method did you use for exporting, did you have plugins on tracks, and if so which ones. Did you use any external processing equipment or was it all done 'in the box'. How many tracks/busses ?

tallpaul
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It was exported via the export menu to file. No plugins, or external processing. I can't remember how many tracks exactly but around 30 I think -- it was sourced from lots of different short wav files and each one ended up in its own track. IIRC correctly exporting at the native sample rate (48hz) was faster than resampling to 44.1hz for burning to a CD.