Mixbus or Ardour 3?

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Kariym
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I just started the 2nd half of a project using Ardour (half of the project was done using Acid Pro and a host of other tools for mastering, etc.). Question: what are the benefits of upgrading to Ardour 3 and mastering in Logic Pro as compared to purchasing and using a new workflow with Mixbus? Thanks...

seablade
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At the moment, you should not be using Ardour3 for any production work, it is not ready for that yet. It is still being heavily developed.

In as far as Ardour vs Mixbus, both have their place. I use both, if I am working on stereo projects I will use Mixbus for mixing and light recording(More studio style recording is fine with it). But for tracking live shows I will go to ardour to ensure I have as little as possible overhead.

The real benefit to Mixbus is how fast you can work in it, I find it very quick to beat a mix into shape with it as most things are integrated at my fingertips(so to speak) in the GUI. This means that for any stereo mixing project I prefer to work in it in general. If however my project is multichannel destined, or otherwise incompatible with Mixbus I switch t Ardour to mix in. I can start in either Ardour or mixbus depending on my recording needs obviously, and I use both continually.

Seablade

Kariym
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Seablade - thank you for the feed back. You mentioned speed / how fast you can work in Mixbus. I tend to be a speed freak when it comes to mixing so hearing you mention this attribute is a big plus for me. I am also wondering about the learning curve, which tends to be lessen since Ardour is part of the architecture. thanks again.

seablade
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If you are used to Ardour, the learning crve for Mixbus is extremely minimal. Most editing operations are identical, and much of the program is at the very least similar if not identical. The only real learning is the interface Harrison provides to its DSP, and a quick glance through their manual will answer most of that for you, though the Intro To Mixbus is a great watch if you aren't to certain on how to work in Ardour yet.

If you are not used to Ardour, the learning curve is about what you would expect coming from another DAW, steep certainly until you can wrap your head around Ardour's way of doing things. People coming from ProTools will probably have the easiest time, though as long as you have a good general foundation in ANY DAW you probably won't have to difficult a time.

Seablade