"House Of The Rising Sun" cover using A3B3.

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mindlessbabel
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Testing Ardour3 Beta3. I thought it turned out well so decided to share.

http://soundcloud.com/mindlessbabel/house-of-the-rising-sun

kelleydv
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I really dig the arrangement and production style, but there's a ton of noise.

The mixing on the vocals is really cool, and the "stereoness" of the main acoustic sounds great. Multiple mics?

mindlessbabel
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I used the open mic on a BOSS br800 for the acoustic and vocals which is where all the extra noise is coming from. My mastering skills are still noobish and It probably didn't help that I mixed everything through iphone earbuds. Thanks for the comments.

kelleydv
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Cool, I just looked at the boss briefly on the web. The built in mic _may_ be the reason for the noise, but here are some tips (I know you didn't ask, but hopefully it helps and you're interested):

1. Get closer to the mic.
This will give you a hotter signal that is louder than the noise. Number-one way to reduce environmental noise - that I know of :)

2. Don't turn the input up too high.
Past a certain point you will get a LOT of noise. One thing I do is monitor the input very loud with my headphones while no instrument is playing. Then I turn the input up until I hear noise. Then I back it off until the noise of the environment is hardly noticeable. On most mics, there will be an obvious point where the noise drops off. Get close to that point with minimum noise. You need to monitor loud though (don't play any tracks or instruments, just listen to the mic).

3. Expanders.
Play with them. You can get some good results once you figure out how to apply it to your situation. Here's a starting point: play a mic'd track and listen to a part where there is no playing, just noise. Use the expander to make signals _above_ that louder.

4. Gates.
A gate can be used to cut out the "blank" parts of a track. It's a lot easier than going through and editing by hand. Just make sure you don't block any quiet parts you want to keep.

Hope you dig!

seablade
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A couple of quick comments...

1. Get closer to the mic.
This will give you a hotter signal that is louder than the noise. Number-one way to reduce environmental noise - that I know of :)

Correct but make certain you don't take it to far as you will affect the sound of your recording with placement as well.

4. Gates.
A gate can be used to cut out the "blank" parts of a track. It's a lot easier than going through and editing by hand. Just make sure you don't block any quiet parts you want to keep.

Personally I prefer not using gates on a recording. I find they never do a good enough job and I am quick enough editing that the time for me to tweak a gate to do even a decent job and the time to edit parts down to just what is needed isn't to dissimilar in most cases.

Seablade

seablade
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I am intrigued by the artistic direction you are taking with this piece. There are some points where I think you could re-record vocals for some tone improvements, and still some work to be done on the mix, especially possibly bringing up your electric for solos/counterpoints. But I am very intrigued by your vocal processing and synth use. (Meaning it is quite likely I will like it when done)

Seablade

mindlessbabel
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Thanks for the comments and advice guys, which I am always seeking. I really appreciate it.