Ardour.org website updated

The ardour.org website has been revamped and rehosted.

The site is now split into two components:

ardour.org
An entirely "static" site without logins, or forums or any user-created content. Super-fast delivery, and steadily increasing, usefully arranged information
community.ardour.org
The "old" Drupal-based site that has user logins, forums, the download system, donates, subscriptions and so forth

Both sites are now hosted on an Amazon EC2 instance, providing vastly more responsive service (at some increase in cost).

Expect more changes in both the substantive arrangement of material on the static site, and various tweaks on both parts of the new site.

Your user login remains unchanged, and all content from the old site has been carried over to the new one (although some pages that used to be part of the Drupal-managed site have migrated to the static part of the site).

Wow..!!!! this is great Paul

Wow..!!!! this is great Paul congrats! i´ve been subscribed for about a year until i got a problem with my bank so... hehe... will subscribe again very soon, its great to see the new site and is great to know A3 is coming soon.

cheers

fantastic news Paul! This

fantastic news Paul! This looks good!

Serious business is about to

Serious business is about to get more serious.

Good stuff, looks great!

Good stuff, looks great!

Congrats, great work, I

Congrats, great work, I really like it! :-)

Very nice new site. Looks

Very nice new site. Looks very pro!

For a second I was like

For a second I was like "wrong site", wow!!!!

Looks fantastic!

:)

Looking good.

Looking good.

At top right I'm seeing

At top right I'm seeing "AdrianFernandezFazio, thanks for your financial support"
That's not my name, which is what used to appear in that position.
Glitch with new site software?
Or does it now deliberately display the name of the latest person to donate/subcribe, instead of the logged in user?

P.S. As soon as I posted the above, it corrected itself. Maybe not a big problem!

I like it too. :)

I like it too. :)

@ anahata think that is a

@ anahata think that is a temporary feature, i was Gmaq for a view minutes :)

WOW, great new website! I was

WOW, great new website!

I was most amazed+entertained+honoured to see my old studio (with Jupiter-6) featured in the scrolling image gallery up top : ) It makes me even more eager to mixdown some music that was recorded there, and ultimately get my new studio finished and operational. I'll take some nice photos of my new place and post audio soon...

I showed my girlfiend the new website; she was impressed by the "Ardour is Open" section : )

Ardour is such fabulous inspiration on so many levels (technically and philosophically), and my reason for discovering Linux back in 2001 after abandoning computing in the MS Dark Ages... : /

KEEP GOING! : )

[Apologies if this isn't the

[Apologies if this isn't the best place to mention this...]

When using Iceweasel 10.0.12 (=Firefox) on most website pages I tried, pressing PageDown or SpaceBar scrolls down a page but the new top line of page text is then hidden under the static top menu bar so you have to scroll back up a bit to read where you got to; no major problem, and might be a browser rendering issue - finish Ardour 3 first! ; )

Just a minor typo on http://ardour.org/development.html
-particulular
+particularly

I look forward to proofreading the new Manual soon when Time allows : )

Really nice :)

Really nice :)

This new website looks really

This new website looks really good. Especially the homepage intro/advertisement for Ardour. Simple, attractive, aesthetically awesome, informative.

However, you might consider changing one thing: the "Musicians" paragraph. It sounds very reactionary, unlike the other paragraphs...especially Ardour is open. Is the point to scare away electronic or hip hop musicians? If not, then consider removing that part. I'm a bit worried about it. Potential Ardour users including talented performers who create non-traditional experimental electronic music may choose to ignore Ardour if they read that it's specially designed for orthodox music production.
As a musician who grew up without a traditional instrument or music education, I've found Ardour to fit my needs. Many other electronic musicians seem to as well. Check the "Made With Ardour" forum. Electronic and hip hop beat-makers use Ardour. I'd feel comfortable predicting that more and more electronic producers will use Ardour in the future unless something is done to drive them away.
I use Hydrogen to sequence (and play with "pads") perc samples that I recorded from random sounds, I use various linux softsynths to design sounds that I play using a MIDI keyboard, then I record and mix everything down in Ardour (using plenty of LV2s), and master my mix using JAMin. I love Ardour and it works for me. I don't play traditional instruments, but I do play "actual instruments." Not quite sure what "actual" is referring to in that sentence on the homepage. Which instruments do you consider to be "not actual"? And how does Ardour step "out of the way to encourage the creative process to remain where it always has been"? Stepping out of the way to encourage traditional status quo music production using well built instruments? Does Ardour therefore discourage innovation and experimentalism in music? Is Ardour not for the likes of bands like, say, Kraftwerk?
Yeah, I'm a little worried. I'm hoping that Ardour doesn't change for the worse in order to become a tool for ONLY traditionalists. Everyone should be able to make use of it, right? Ardour is my favorite DAW and that's why I make monthy donations. I really hope that electronic musicians are welcome in the Ardour community.

Great look, but, well, eh,

Great look, but, well, eh, perhaps I'm partially blind somehow, but, how do you post new topics in the forums?

Go to your user menu on the

Go to your user menu on the left side of the screen and click "Create content".

Thanks!

Thanks!

Ableton Live and a few other

Ableton Live and a few other applications introduced/benefited from a new zeitgeist, if you will, which has centered on the creation of music via looped segments of sound (sometimes MIDI). There is no "playing" per se, just arranging of material in time, either ahead of time (along a timeline) or triggering (which if you are generous, could be seen as a form of playing). When I use the term "playing an instrument" I am referring to the use of a device of any kind that is designed to somehow mediate between your intentions and the production of sound, and which, in the words of Brian Eno, "has properties that the body can learn but the mind cannot". Tools like Live are really cool if you want to participate in the kind of workflow that they really support best, and it would not surprise me if in the future Ardour gains some of this functionality. But it is not an approach to making music that interests me personally very much, and I have yet to hear music made that way which really strikes me as benefitting from the particular workflow involved. I don't care whether you make music with the sounds of a gourd being scraped or program supercollider to do your bidding. I don't care if it sounds like Palestrina, Jimi Hendrix or O Yuki Conjugate. I'm just not very interested in the "ooh, i hit this pad on the downbeat every time, man doesn't this sound cool" model of music production.

But that text will be probably be edited anyway, for other reasons :)

Yeah, I use Ardour because it

Yeah, I use Ardour because it works best for me and I don't use Ableton Live because I like Ardour way better (i have Ableton on Win7 which i rarely boot into). The new MIDI tracks in Ardour have the piano roll, virtual note writing/playing capability, and that's something I remember seeing people use in Ableton as well. I think that feature is not only new in Ardour, but it seems like a new feature in music. Piano roll seems to be used most notably in electronic music - the ability to play notes and chords by clicking on virtual representations of keys, thereby having a whole complex pattern of chords without needing any finger dexterity (I see friends who produce house, bass, IDM or DnB music using this piano roll method ALOT). I myself prefer playing on a keyboard with my fingers because I really get into it and rock out...moving my body is part of the pleasure of music production, it feels right. Feels kind of liberating and feels like I'm really expressing myself. I just don't play or own any accoustic instruments.
The piano roll MIDI track feature in Ardour will probably attract more attention from electronic producers around the world. Unless Ardour is marketed as an explicitly anti-electronic, pro-traditionalist DAW, of course (which it's not because electronic producers use it and love it, myself included). But hey, that's my opinion and I hope I'm not wasting your time with it. Cheers

Piano Roll is a newer feature

Piano Roll is a newer feature in music (And it's thousands of years history) yes. But far from it in DAWs. In fact many composers for film I know prefer using it to compose for film, and it has been around for quite some time in other DAWs.

Seablade

For sure, the piano roll is a

For sure, the piano roll is a staple in electronic music now. FL Studio, Cubase, Reason, Ableton, Pro Tools...basically every DAW has it. I don't know when it started or which company started it, but i remember first seeing it about ten years ago (when i was in high school) in the Cubase DAW. I thought it was really cool and futuristic back then. Now piano roll seems almost as common as sample step sequencers. Piano roll seems like the same thing as a step sequencer, just for MIDI notes instead of samples/percussion. I'm going to try recording a chord progression using the new piano roll now. Maybe with the Triceratops LV2. This conversation is getting me in the mood to take my hands off the keyboard and give the piano roll a chance:)